dear darkling

Nothing to see here. No, really.

2,851 notes

stoptellingwomentosmile:

through-the-pesticide:

archmasterjazzy:

tasa-arvoitus:

poppypicklesticks:

m-l-t:

iamelizah:

The artist behind the “Stop Telling Women to Smile” campaign wheat pasting in downtown Atlanta, GA.

This is such a vain campaign.

how self absorbed do you have to be 

I guess I’m an oppressor now because I tell people to smile if I see them sad.In my case, smiling can actually help you feel better.

If being asked to smile is the worst thing to happen to women, I’ll take it. 

Because trying to be friendly is oppression. Ever tried to see things a bit more positively? Maybe someone asks you to smile because they want to try and cheer you up a bit? No, let’s just assume that all those evil gross men want you to smile for their entertainment only, because OBVIOUSLY every man is selfish like that (oh and women would never ever say things like that am I right?). 

*rubs temples*"I tell people to smile if I see them sad."You assume that someone is sad. And sometimes, people do not appreciate you interjecting your assumptions onto them. Moving throughout the day with a neutral face does not mean you are sad. It means that you are simply not smiling.If someone IS sad, being told to smile is not an automatic pick-me-up. Smiling is a natural reaction. People do not need to be told when to smile. It will happen easily and genuinely for them."If being asked to smile is the worst thing to happen to women, I’ll take it."Really? Do you really think this work is saying that being told to smile is the worst thing that happens to women?  "Maybe someone asks you to smile because they want to try and cheer you up a bit?"Wrong. “Smile for me.” “You’d be prettier if you smiled.” “Let me get a smile.” etc. Those are not gestures of comfort. Those are attempts by the man asking (read: demanding) to make the woman more approachable for HIM. For her to be more physically appealing to HIM. It has nothing to do with her or her emotions. And that is what the title work is about. I find it really mind-boggling that I have to remind people that the title of the project has nothing to do with the act of smiling. It’s about the demand to smile. It’s also interesting that the Smile piece is the subject of this thread, when it isn’t the piece in the photo. STWTS encompasses a range of statements that address street harassment - including the one pictured, “Women Are Not Outside For Your Entertainment”. Why isn’t the conversation about that poster? Being told to smile is one instance that fits into this larger context of the way women are treated in the public space. Each poster serves as that very same thing - one reaction to a particular type of treatment. All together, the posters are confronting a larger issue. People get stuck on the smile piece, when there is a larger issue that the posters are pointing to. 

stoptellingwomentosmile:

through-the-pesticide:

archmasterjazzy:

tasa-arvoitus:

poppypicklesticks:

m-l-t:

iamelizah:

The artist behind the “Stop Telling Women to Smile” campaign wheat pasting in downtown Atlanta, GA.

This is such a vain campaign.

how self absorbed do you have to be 

I guess I’m an oppressor now because I tell people to smile if I see them sad.

In my case, smiling can actually help you feel better.

If being asked to smile is the worst thing to happen to women, I’ll take it. 

Because trying to be friendly is oppression. Ever tried to see things a bit more positively? Maybe someone asks you to smile because they want to try and cheer you up a bit? No, let’s just assume that all those evil gross men want you to smile for their entertainment only, because OBVIOUSLY every man is selfish like that (oh and women would never ever say things like that am I right?). 

*rubs temples*

"I tell people to smile if I see them sad."
You assume that someone is sad. And sometimes, people do not appreciate you interjecting your assumptions onto them. Moving throughout the day with a neutral face does not mean you are sad. It means that you are simply not smiling.
If someone IS sad, being told to smile is not an automatic pick-me-up. Smiling is a natural reaction. People do not need to be told when to smile. It will happen easily and genuinely for them.

"If being asked to smile is the worst thing to happen to women, I’ll take it."
Really? Do you really think this work is saying that being told to smile is the worst thing that happens to women?
 
"Maybe someone asks you to smile because they want to try and cheer you up a bit?"
Wrong. “Smile for me.” “You’d be prettier if you smiled.” “Let me get a smile.” etc. Those are not gestures of comfort. Those are attempts by the man asking (read: demanding) to make the woman more approachable for HIM. For her to be more physically appealing to HIM. 
It has nothing to do with her or her emotions. And that is what the title work is about. 

I find it really mind-boggling that I have to remind people that the title of the project has nothing to do with the act of smiling. It’s about the demand to smile. 

It’s also interesting that the Smile piece is the subject of this thread, when it isn’t the piece in the photo. STWTS encompasses a range of statements that address street harassment - including the one pictured, “Women Are Not Outside For Your Entertainment”. Why isn’t the conversation about that poster?
Being told to smile is one instance that fits into this larger context of the way women are treated in the public space. Each poster serves as that very same thing - one reaction to a particular type of treatment. All together, the posters are confronting a larger issue. People get stuck on the smile piece, when there is a larger issue that the posters are pointing to. 

Filed under feminism i love this project and the artist so hard

3,170 notes

ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World

medievalpoc:

livestockmenace:

medievalpoc:

Spanning one-ninth of the earth’s circumference across three continents, the Roman Empire ruled a quarter of humanity through complex networks of political power, military domination and economic exchange. These extensive connections were sustained by premodern transportation and communication technologies that relied on energy generated by human and animal bodies, winds, and currents.

Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information. Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity.

For the first time, ORBIS allows us to express Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity.

Taking account of seasonal variation and accommodating a wide range of modes and means of transport, ORBIS reveals the true shape of the Roman world and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history.

Not gonna lie, this is kind of amazing.

Basically, you can plan a trip from Rome to Alexandria, and get an estimate of journey time, expense of trip, the supplies you’ll need….let’s just say it’s better than Oregon Trail:

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Does this mean that we could plan our pilgrimage via amphibious kayak?!?

As long as you plan to do it two thousand years ago.

Which apparently might be possible since some of my readers found a Medieval TARDIS:

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Although…. the dress code for Medieval TARDIS travel might be slightly problematic.

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[X]

Filed under Roman empire history is awesome geekitude

2,628 notes

medievalpoc:

lawd-knows:

5centsapound:

Terrance Houle: Urban Indian Series (2004), 

Born December 9, 1975, in Calgary. Lives and works in Calgary. In a practice that ranges from performance to photography to film and video works, Blackfoot artist Terrance Houle remakes the troubled history of colonialism and First Nations identity with a roguish wit and punk-rock edge. His strategy matches self-deprecating humour with an uneasy undertone; the results cut away at both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal notions of an urban Indian status quo. In his Urban Indian Series (2004), Houle is pictured grocery shopping, working in an office cubicle and riding public transit—all in elaborate powwow regalia.

In the performance video Friend or Foe (2010–11), he plays off cultural and historical gaps in communication while dressed in a loincloth and communicating by sign language.

turn up

Contemporary Art Week!

411 notes

medievalpoc:

Lucy MacKeith has started a research project tracing Black History in Devon, England. The map is explored in this document, which offers a brief exploration of primary documents, artworks, and records. It is downloadable and translates well into an educational handout.
Further exploration and thematic writing is available here on the following topics:

Foreword by Sam Walker, Director, AMBH


Why black history in Devon?


Black Romans in Devon?


Saint Maurice


Devon’s connection with the slave trade and slavery


Gravestones illustrating the links between Devon and black history


Black people and the sea; The London 


The Swete Family in Modbury 


Joe Green


Devon and the abolition of the slave trade


Compensation for slavery?


How to remember slavery and the slave trade?


Who is this man?


Olaudah Equiano Moretonhampstead


Black soldiers and Devon


My Father, by Zena Burland


Jane, a black Devonian


How to take the study of black history forward


Conclusion   -  writing black history of the past and today


Resources for learning


Notes for educators in schools, museums and libraries


Notes on the text


Picture sources and acknowledgements


Photo credits


Mapping the black presence in Devon

medievalpoc:

Lucy MacKeith has started a research project tracing Black History in Devon, England. The map is explored in this document, which offers a brief exploration of primary documents, artworks, and records. It is downloadable and translates well into an educational handout.

Further exploration and thematic writing is available here on the following topics: